.Black hair. 80s music. morbit. alcohol. tattoos. piercings.mouth of a sailor.

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jumpingjacktrash:

dharmagun:

archiemcphee:

What happens when two baroque cellists perform a cover of “Thunderstruck" by AC/DC? They shred. Literally. Keep an eye on their bows as the piece progresses.

This awesome video features Croatian cellists Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser, aka 2Cellos, playing their phenomenal “BaRock style” arrangement of the hard rock classic for a completely bewildered 17th century audience. The concept is wonderful, but the actual performance is astonishing.

[via Geeks are Sexy]

ok that was seriously badass. PLAY, CROATIAN BEAUTIES, PLAY WHILE I SHIP YOU.

i love the way the sound changes as the bows gradually disintegrate, too.

that was FUCKING AWESOME.

THAT WAS EPIC

fashioninhistory:

Dress (“robe à la française”) 
1760
This is a typical Rococo period women’s dress, “robe à la française”. The ensemble shown here consists of a gown, the petticoat much like what we would call a skirt today, and a stomacher made in a triangular panel shape. The gown opens in the front, and has large pleats folded up at the back. All this would be worn after formed with a corset and pannier, which acted as underclothes. Until clothing accepted drastic changes with the 1789 French Revolution, rich outfits, such as is shown here, were worn. 
During 18th century France, the court culture termed “Rococo” blossomed. The clothes of this period, like those shown here, used luxurious silk textiles made in Lyon, France. The dress itself, in addition to already utilizing decorative textile, also adorned lace, ribbon, artificial flowers, and other ornaments were excessive but represented sophisticated spirits.

fashioninhistory:

Dress (“robe à la française”)

1760

This is a typical Rococo period women’s dress, “robe à la française”. The ensemble shown here consists of a gown, the petticoat much like what we would call a skirt today, and a stomacher made in a triangular panel shape. The gown opens in the front, and has large pleats folded up at the back. All this would be worn after formed with a corset and pannier, which acted as underclothes. Until clothing accepted drastic changes with the 1789 French Revolution, rich outfits, such as is shown here, were worn.

During 18th century France, the court culture termed “Rococo” blossomed. The clothes of this period, like those shown here, used luxurious silk textiles made in Lyon, France. The dress itself, in addition to already utilizing decorative textile, also adorned lace, ribbon, artificial flowers, and other ornaments were excessive but represented sophisticated spirits.